College Students Need More Than Money

The human brain is truly an exceptional resource. And when given the right opportunities and adequate support it needs to grow and thrive, the brain can be an amazing investment.

A college education is an invaluable opportunity, and adds a certain edge to those who take it seriously. Historically black colleges, in particular, have managed to produce 18 percent of African-Americans with bachelor’s degrees as well as 25 percent of African-Americans with bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math-related fields.Photo of graduating college students

Three years ago, they were four percent of all four-year colleges and universities in the country, but historically black colleges and universities have been able to master providing their students with both the skills they need as well as the skills society needs them to have. The U.S. Department of Education’s White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities gathered research suggesting that university and college students are optimally served when they complete their degrees on time, persisting through their specific curriculum, and graduating with small or no debts and the ability to find prospective employment opportunities.

The financial burden of a college education is something a majority of U.S. undergraduates are facing today, and even more so within historically black universities and colleges, as their students are primarily first-generation minority students from low-income households. So obviously, something needs to be done to ease the financial strain.

A scholarship as little as $5,000 has the power to increase graduation rate by 7 percent, according to the United Negro College Fund. It’s statistics like those that have pushed companies to invest in students, because they’re ultimately investing in the future. Anheuser-Busch partnered with the UNCF to invest $150,000 in scholarships to support the education and development of 30 exceptional student leaders.

The student leaders, who are all enrolled in historically black colleges and universities, were spotlighted at the Legends of the Crown Leadership Symposium in St. Louis, Missouri earlier this month. The weekend-long event had participants immerse themselves in a community service project, leadership development training, and career-building seminars.

It’s events like the Legends of the Crown Leadership Symposium that highlight the country’s dire need to support our college students more than just financially. Scholarships and adequate financial aid programs aren’t enough, the youths of today needs access to more well-rounded resources and proactive programs so they can become the leaders of tomorrow.


 

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4 Tips for Skillful Public Speaking

microphone-barbara mckinzieMany face public speaking with an air of fear in their stomach. However, there are several ways to overcome that feeling and attack the art masterfully. Perhaps it is refreshing to know that this subject has been discussed all throughout history.

In ancient Greece, individuals believed in the power of persuasion and public speaking. Philosopher, Aristotle identified three components of communication that if followed correctly would make for the most powerful method of conveying ideas. He highlighted Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. Ethos involves gaining the respect of the listeners, Pathos is the appeal to the listeners’ emotions, and Logos includes the facts used to convey a message. There are more tips that will make a public speech powerful.

Prepare

A speech that comes across as spontaneous can take the most prep time. Winston Churchill and Mark Twain both acknowledge that practice is a valuable component of effective speaking. Churchill went as far as executing 45 hours of preparing for a speech that was meant to be 45 minutes long.

The Big Idea

Within the first few moments of being on stage, it is important for the speaker to get to the main point of their presentation. Some of the top TED talks all employ the same method. It is similar to an unforgettable song that has a recognition worthy hook. Give the audience something that they can take with them.

Artful Pause

Taking a moment of silence before beginning is a method of gaining the audience’s attention. Napoleon Bonaparte was known for doing this with his troops. This strategy adds weight to the words about to be said and can also be found in negotiation meetings or sales pitches.

Be Authentic

Use casual wording and a tone that would appeal to those in a barbershop, for example, even if you are on stage delivering a speech. Ronald Reagan explored this approach during his years as a radio broadcaster. To better reach his listeners, he didn’t want to think of them as random individuals. He spoke as if he were building camaraderie at his local barber. This type of banter is more relatable.

To read more, visit Fast Company online here.